The Aylesbury Estate

Monday 5th September 2016

The Aylesbury Estate

The Aylesbury Estate is made up of almost 3000 homes, making it one of the largest housing estates in Europe, it is also one of the most culturally diverse. For 7500 of us - it is home.


The estate was designed by the by architect Hans Peter "Felix" Trenton. Building began in 1963 and was completed in 1977. The estate was named after Aylesbury in Buckinghamshire and the various sections of the estate are named after other local towns and villages in Buckinghamshire including Foxcote, Wendover, Winslow, Padbury, Taplow, Ravenstone, Latimer and Chiltern.

Problems with the building began almost the moment the construction was complete.  Leaks and floods, problems with the lifts and pest problems have been ongoing problems for residents for years.

Crime and the fear of crime has also been a major concern for residents for decades. However, in the major headline grabbing incidents that have taken place on the estate, the perpetrators were not residents of the Aylesbury estate, but had found the architecture of the area conducive to carrying out their crimes.

As a result of these ongoing issues with the estate, it was decided that the rebuilding was the most cost effective solution, so the estate is now going through one of the biggest programmes of regeneration in the country. Southwark Council are planning to demolish the estate and replace the it with modern houses controlled by a housing association. The plan involves increasing the density of housing from the current 2,700 units to 4,900. 2,288 units would remain social housing and the remainder would be for sale. The sale of these units is planned to fund the whole scheme.

The regeneration of the Aylesbury Estate has been divided into several phases which will see the estate being re-built in 20 years. Some of these phases have already been rebuilt, mainly at the top of Albany Road, but demolition has also begun on what is called Site 7 on the corner of East Street and Thurlow Street. The large block Bradenham and Chiltern are now almost empty and will be next for demolition. 

Notting Hill Housing were appointed as the development partner by Southwark Council and will now develop the rest of the estate.

In 1999 the Labour government set up a New Deal for Communities for the Aylesbury estate, this ended in 2009, and Creation Trust was set up as the successor organisation, to ensure that residents currently living on the estate will see real advantages from the regeneration of the area. Not just new homes, but the social and economic advantages, which means, employment opportunities, youth projects, activities for older people. 

To read more visit www.aylesburynow.london

Southwark Council's dedicated Aylesbury estate pages 

 

 

On 27 September 2005, the London Borough of Southwark decided that rather than spend £350 million updating the estate to basic living standards they would order its demolition and replace the dwellings with modern houses controlled by a housing association. The plan involves increasing the density of housing from the current 2,700 units to 4,900. 2,288 units would remain social housing and the remainder would be for sale. The sale of these units is planned to fund the whole scheme.
Over the summer of 2008, local residents and members of the community craft group, In-Spire, in conjunction with London knitting group I Knit London, launched a unique project to create a knitted scale model of the estate as a lasting memorial to the estate, prior to its demolition.
In 2009 the nearby Heygate Estate served as the backdrop to a feature length film called Harry Brown which starred Michael Caine.[6] The film centres on the violence of a youth gang in a fictional British housing estate and the violent response exacted by a lonely pensioner. Many of the young men living at Aylesbury Estate had small parts in the film.
The regeneration of the Aylesbury Estate has been divided into several phases which will see the estate being re-built in 20 years.[7] The indicative phasing plan states when tenants plan to be re-housed and when leasehold properties would be bought by Southwark Council however, this timetable is subject to a certain amount of flux, until the development partner is appointed and the more detailed scheduling of the work can begin, which will offer greater certainty to residents about when they will need to move. The first Phase 1a was completed in August 2013, it lies to the south west corner of the Aylesbury Estate and is divided into four development sites: A, C, B/E and D. This phase was developed with L&Q. It comprises 261 units, and a new resource centre for adults with disabilities. It is a mixture of affordable and private housing, with existing Aylesbury residents given priority to move into the new buildings.[8On 27 September 2005, the London Borough of Southwark decided that rather than spend £350 million updating the estate to basic living standards they would order its demolition and replace the dwellings with modern houses controlled by a housing association. The plan involves increasing the density of housing from the current 2,700 units to 4,900. 2,288 units would remain social housing and the remainder would be for sale. The sale of these units is planned to fund the whole scheme.
Over the summer of 2008, local residents and members of the community craft group, In-Spire, in conjunction with London knitting group I Knit London, launched a unique project to create a knitted scale model of the estate as a lasting memorial to the estate, prior to its demolition.
In 2009 the nearby Heygate Estate served as the backdrop to a feature length film called Harry Brown which starred Michael Caine.[6] The film centres on the violence of a youth gang in a fictional British housing estate and the violent response exacted by a lonely pensioner. Many of the young men living at Aylesbury Estate had small parts in the film.
The regeneration of the Aylesbury Estate has been divided into several phases which will see the estate being re-built in 20 years.[7] The indicative phasing plan states when tenants plan to be re-housed and when leasehold properties would be bought by Southwark Council however, this timetable is subject to a certain amount of flux, until the development partner is appointed and the more detailed scheduling of the work can begin, which will offer greater certainty to residents about when they will need to move. The first Phase 1a was completed in August 2013, it lies to the south west corner of the Aylesbury Estate and is divided into four development sites: A, C, B/E and D. This phase was developed with L&Q. It comprises 261 units, and a new resource centre for adults with disabilities. It is a mixture of affordable and private housing, with existing Aylesbury residents given priority to move into the new buildings.[